Loading…
The American Chemical Society (ACS), the SENCER Centers of Innovation Southwest and South, and Bellhaven University welcome you to Jackson, Mississippi and to our symposium with a theme of STEM Education in Mississippi: Issues and Innovations. Throughout a full-day of activities, we will focus on use of innovative and proven pedagogy to reduce barriers to learning, student success, and retention. Presenters include educators and administrators from throughout the country. 

We look forward to seeing you at Belhaven’s Kim Center -- Friday, September 29, 2017! Remember to REGISTER so we know how many meals to prepare!

Google’s directions to Belhaven University.  
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Friday, September 29
 

10:30am

Registration Opens
Registration

Friday September 29, 2017 10:30am - 6:30pm
Kim Center at Belhaven University

11:00am

Poster Session
Poster Session

Friday September 29, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Kim Center at Belhaven University

11:45am

Lunch
Lunch

Friday September 29, 2017 11:45am - 12:30pm
Kim Center at Belhaven University

12:30pm

Welcome Address
Welcome

Speakers
avatar for Roger Parrott

Roger Parrott

President, Belhaven University


Friday September 29, 2017 12:30pm - 12:35pm
Kim Center 202

12:35pm

Your Role in the Transformation of Science and Engineering Education
From those seemingly small but evidence-based teaching innovations that infiltrate the classic lecture style classroom to the discovery-based laboratories that lead to large scale national dissemination changes, YOU, the faculty, and institutional enablers are at the core of STEM reform. The power of science education for our democracy has required us to shift from inert learning -- memorizing definitions and facts with little freedom for students to choose topics or innovative to an environment which is liberating, that is, a more challenging standard by which students command both the subject knowledge and the skills needed to seek out new information with the power to use knowledge for public good.

In this session we explore how national dissemination programs supported by the National Science Foundation (SENCER -- Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities) and the National Academy of Engineering (Global Grand Challenge Scholars Program) have created communities of transformation which have made sustainable, long term, evidence-based science and engineering education reform.

Speakers
avatar for Karen Kashmanian Oates

Karen Kashmanian Oates

Professor, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Dean Karen Oates currently serves as the Peterson Family Dean of Arts & Sciences at WPI where she is responsible for 7 departments and 6 programs spanning the natural and life sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities, mathematics and computer science. Dr. Oates joined WPI from the National Science Foundation, where she served as a Deputy Director of the Division of Undergraduate Education charged with supporting innovative programs to strengthen STEM education and help revitalize American entrepreneurship and... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 12:35pm - 1:15pm
Kim Center 202

1:15pm

Why SENCER Works: Engaging Communities, Transforming Learning
Teaching students to work in, and with, communities enmeshes them in real-world problems and engages them in forming and developing communities. It likewise involves faculty in methods of research and teaching that are necessarily collaborative, engaged and relevant, fostering a collaborative approach to both activities that supports all community members.

This session explores how teaching (science) through community engagement transforms education in ways that prepare students for success in the 21st century far better than traditional pedagogies. We'll use a SENCER-ized grant-writing course as a model to help us understand how teaching through civic engagement aligns pedagogy with what we know about learning, resulting in deeper, more durable, more integrated learning. Assessment data will show how we know that this approach works both at the program (SENCER) level and at the level of the individual course.

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Carroll

Stephen Carroll

Santa Clara University
Professor Stephen Carroll is director of Core Writing and co-director of the Professional Writing Program at Santa Clara University. Stephen works on a team supported by the National Science Foundation to upgrade the platform for the online Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) assessment tool, and continues to develop new features to make the SALG easier to use and more effective for educators. He also contributes his expertise to... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 1:15pm - 1:55pm
Kim Center 202

1:55pm

Takeaways from Beyond the Classroom: A Student Perspective on SENCER
What is a student's perspective of SENCER? In this session, we will hear how participation in SENCER activities outside the classroom provides a sense of purpose and context to in-class conceptual learning, leading to increased engagement in classrooms. Interestingly, this increased engagement extends to classrooms which do not employ the SENCER model of learning. This heightened level of classroom engagement yields motivation to pursue further civic engagement activities outside the classroom, closing the loop.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Johnson

Courtney Johnson

PhD Student, Duke University
Courtney Johnson is a PhD candidate at Duke University’s Department of Chemistry where she is working on 3D multi-resolution microscopy in Professor Welsher’s lab. She received her BS in Chemistry from Texas Woman’s University.


Friday September 29, 2017 1:55pm - 2:15pm
Kim Center 202

2:15pm

Ways to Increase Civic Applications of Learning
In this session we will use a SENCER Model Course focused on the natural sciences to teach biology and public policy through civic issues as a guide. Mysteries of Migration is a model course that has undergone revi-sion over many years accommodating both non-majors and majors in the natural sciences.  In consideration of developing or modifying a course you teach, we will briefly consider: how people learn, learning goals, adding appropriate experiential learning to courses and student assessment of courses. This interactive session will address pedagogical approaches used over the years in Mysteries of Migration as a guide for lessons learned. There will be an opportunity to discuss potential modifi-cations you may wish to make to courses you teach. 

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Wood

Thomas Wood

Associate Professor, George Mason University
Tom Wood is an associate professor at George Mason University where he coordinates conservation studies at the School of Integrative Studies. He has been with the SENCER project since the inception of the program. Presently he serves as Co-Director of the SENCER Center for Innova... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Kim Center 100

2:15pm

Turning SENCER Questions into Real Research Projects
The SENCER approach to teaching science courses leads to an examination of problems that our society needs to address. If the questions that arise have a local connection, there is a great opportunity to transform the questions into an undergraduate research experience. This talk will illustrate how a selection of issues that arose in an introductory chemistry class led to actions that constituted aspects of undergraduate research. Examples to be illustrated include: impacts to surface water from chemical street deicers, lead and chromium in yellow curb paint, construction of a grassy swale parking lot at a WalMart facility and a re-examination of local bus service routes. In all cases, undergraduate students contributed to the solution of environmental problems in the community. Students remarked on the empowerment they felt through participation in the activities.

Speakers
avatar for Garon Smith

Garon Smith

Professor Emeritus, University of Montana
Garon Smith is a Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Montana. He received his B.A. degree in Environmental Biology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1973 and his Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry from the Colorado school of Mines in 1983. He has previously served on the faculties of Colorado School of Mines, Colorado College and SUNY College at Fredonia. At The University of Montana in Missoula since 1991, Dr. Smith taught the first half of the introductory chemistry sequence for applied science majors as well as upper division and graduate courses in analytical and environmental chemistry. He retired from full-time teaching in July 2015.Since 1992, Dr. Smith has been the chemist for the University of... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Kim Center 103

2:15pm

SENCER for Chemistry Majors
Since becoming involved with SENCER in 2007, civic engagement activities have been incorporated into all of the science courses for non-majors that are offered in our department including Sustainable Physical Science, Earth Science, Climate Change and Introduction to Environmental Science, to name a few. This was a fairly facile process since the content of these courses can be quite flexible. On the other hand, incorporating civic engagement activities into the majors' courses is more difficult since the content is fairly rigid and must be covered.

However, content will not be sacrificed if such activities are creatively incorporated into the laboratory components of these courses. Further, it has been well established that linking content to real world issues positively impacts student learning. This presentation is a brief description of how we have incorporated civic engagement into our majorsÍ curriculum such as first year chemistry, organic chemistry, and instrumental analysis.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Sheardy

Richard Sheardy

Professor and Chair, Texas Woman’s University
Richard Sheardy was born in Lake Orion, MI and received his BS in Chemistry Education at Michigan State University. After earning his PhD in organic chemistry at University of Florida, he had a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in biophysics at University of Rochester. Sheardy began his academic career at the Hazleton Campus of Penn State University and then went to Seton Hall University where he initiated his research on DNA conformation and... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Kim Center 105

2:45pm

Dual Posters: Communicating Your Discipline to the Public
Many scientists do important work that could have a profound impact on their own field as well as others, but then struggle to communicate their results. Part of the challenge is that each discipline, and specialty within it, has jargon that is often not understood by the general public or others in complementary fields of research.

By learning to reduce jargon and describe highly complex ideas so that most well-educated people can understand, researchers will be better equipped to share the significance of their work with those in other disciplines, and better able to inform policy makers about their science.

We are early in the process of learning how we learn a discipline, and how learning in one discipline varies from learning in another. Mental skills needed for undergraduate success are not generally explicitly taught. By guiding students through the steps essential to acquiring the needed communication skills, we can guide their metamorphosis from novice to professional scientist.

Dual posters may be an effective way for science students to learn how to e_ectively communicate their research to non-experts. Using a handbook with a step-by-step process for translating an existing scientific "technical" poster into a "public" poster version that is more easily understood by general audiences, student researchers learn how to explain their work in an understandable way while keeping the integrity of their science intact.

Collaborators are sought to work on this concept in a variety of academic institutions and disciplines. We have some basis to say that creating a public version of a technical research poster may be an effective tool, but considering our extremely small sample size, additional data from other institutions is desirable to add credibility to this claim. Results of our pilot study of dual poster effectiveness are included along with questions that focus our future research.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Maguire

Cynthia Maguire

Senior Lecturer, Texas Woman’s University
Cynthia Maguire earned her bachelor of science in medical technology from Central State University in 1976. She later earned two M.S. degrees--biology teaching (2001) and chemistry teaching (2004), both from Texas Woman’s University. She remained at TWU and is now a Senior Lecturer in the Chemistry and Biochemistry... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kim Center 100

2:45pm

Civic Engagement Research Projects Embedded in Environmental Courses
Civic Engagement project work can enhance student learning and undergraduate research projects are known as high impact practices. For Saint Marys' College students, the environmental chemistry course has a community based research (CBR) project incorporated into the lab curriculum to facilitate discovery and reinforce content learning. The civic engagement research can range from simple dissolved oxygen measurements to elemental soil screening (using field portable XRF). For effective research, students build proficiency with the instrumentation on a test site before addressing the community's site or issue. For all project work, students collect data, have a guided reflection, and communicate their results to the community partner. Embedding CBR in the curriculum expands the number of students who are introduced to research and yields a dynamic curriculum which benefits the students, the faculty and the community. Incorporating this civic engagement adds new access challenges yet the benefits for student learning outweigh the added work. Three illustrious examples are discussed highlighting both the benefits and challenges. Some student attitudinal responses were assessed as a portion of the evidence of student learning gains. The XRF soil screening work has also generated a new research area for the instructor and this added benefit will be highlighted.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Bachofer

Steven Bachofer

Professor, Saint Mary’s College
Steven Bachofer is a professor of chemistry at Saint Mary's College of California. He received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of the Pacific and his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Brown University.  Steve worked as a research chemist in the consumer products industry before he began teaching. Building on that experience, he studies the changes in cationic surfactant aggregate morphology with added organic counterions as a research area that he shares with undergraduates... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kim Center 103

2:45pm

Introducing SALG: How SENCER's Course Assessment Tool Protects Innovative Teaching
In this session we will use a SENCER Model Course focused on the natural sciences to teach biology and public policy through civic issues as a guide. Mysteries of Migration is a model course that has undergone revision over many years accommodating both non-majors and majors in the natural sciences.æ In consideration of developing or modifying a course you teach, we will briefy consider: how people learn, learning goals, adding appropriate experiential learning to courses and student assessment of courses. This interactive session will address pedagogical approaches used over the years in Mysteries of Migration as a guide for lessons learned. There will be an opportunity to discuss potential modifcations you may wish to make to courses you teach. 

Speakers
avatar for Stephen Carroll

Stephen Carroll

Santa Clara University
Professor Stephen Carroll is director of Core Writing and co-director of the Professional Writing Program at Santa Clara University. Stephen works on a team supported by the National Science Foundation to upgrade the platform for the online Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) assessment tool, and continues to develop new features to make the SALG easier to use and more effective for educators. He also contributes his expertise to... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Kim Center 105

3:15pm

Poster Show at the Mall
One of the challenges scientists face today is sharing their science with the general public. The main difficulty is a communication barrier. Scientists need to be able to talk about their research and findings in terms that the general public can understand. It is important for public stakeholders to have high regard for science and scientists and appreciate the ongoing research. When the public embraces what happens in the research labs, they will support federally funded research.

At Texas Woman's University (TWU), we held an event Pioneer Research at the Mall in Denton to communicate what we do at TWU with the larger community. Through this event, we were able to show people what kind of work and research we do as a way of not only making them aware of our work but to also igniting broader interest in attending TWU. We aimed to improve dialogue between young scientists and the public by having students prepare a more general and non-technical version of their research poster and present it to the Denton community. One result of this event was to show the citizens of our community that they are sup-porting many great students mostly, women and underrepre-sented minorities, in their research. The students in turn learn to engage the public as responsible citizens and eventually making the world a better place. In this presentation, we will discuss details of this event, outcomes and response to the surveyed questions.

Speakers
avatar for Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan

Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan

Assistant Professor, Texas Woman’s University
Nasrin Mirsaleh-Kohan received her Bachelor of Science degree in Physics at the University of Tehran. She came to the U.S. as a graduate student and earned her Master’s degree in computational Physics at the Bowling Green State University. In 2008, she finished her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Tennessee (UT), followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Sherbrooke in Canada. Then she returned to Tennessee and was a postdoctoral research associate at UT. Kohan accepted her first tenure-track faculty position at Texas... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Kim Center 100

3:15pm

Establishing Local Partnerships that Actively Engage STEM Students and Instructors in Meaningful and Relevant Educational Experience
Students and instructors of STEM both benefit when their courses and educational programs are connected to actual real-world problems, issues and opportunities that have local connections. Most textbooks of science and mathematics are written from disconnected and highly generalized global perspectives that are not always obviously applicable to students and faculty that use them as a resource. To overcome this disconnection, instructors can augment STEM courses for general science education and advanced science audiences with resources derived from partnerships that make use of more practical local and regional connections.æBy partnering with informal science educators and other entities connected to local and regional issues (e.g., zoos, parks, museums, businesses, government/non-government organizations) it is possible for instructors to breathe much needed life into their potentially stale course material. These same partnerships also potentially connect educational institutions with non-traditional funding opportunities, help in marketing of their program through news and media, as well as prepare students for job placement through research, internships, and professional networking.

In this presentation, attendees will learn how interdisciplinary general science and advanced discipline-specific STEM courses at Belhaven University have been enhanced through active partnerships with the Jackson Zoological Park, Wildlife Mississippi, the Army Corps of Engineers, and Tara Wildlife. These partnerships connect students and faculty alike with those organizations that have the strongest connections to important local and regional challenges.æ Even students who leave the region after graduation benefit from the experiences through their experiences which provide a template for how to work within local communities.æ Attendees will also learn how to craft agreements with local partners as well as navigate the complexities of engaging students of traditional lecture and laboratory based STEM courses in the "real-world." Specific perspectives and testimonials from local partner representatives will provide attendees with a clear perspective of how to nurture successful mutually beneficial agreements.

Speakers
avatar for Reid Bishop

Reid Bishop

Associate Professor, Belhaven University
Reid Bishop is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and the Division Chair of Natural Sciences at Belhaven University. He earned his Bachelor of Science at Mississippi College and his Ph.D. from the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry. After post-d... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Kim Center 103

3:15pm

SENCER for all Disciplines: Classroom Examples Ranging from Projects to Curricula
How can you "SENCERize" your existing STEM class in an impactful, yet manageable way? In this session, we will explore several successful examples, ranging in scale from a classroom project to a thematic cluster of multi-disciplinary classes to an entire curriculum. Examples include classes for the major and non-major and span the STEM disciplines. Do-able service-learning -- authentic two-way service and learning -- projects are included. Time will be reserved at the end of the session for questions and/or discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Reiser

Susan Reiser

Senior Lecturer and Associate Dean of Natural Sciences at UNC Asheville, SENCER Center of Innovation South Co-Director
Susan Reiser teaches at UNC Asheville where she is a Senior Lecturer and Associate Dean of Natural Sciences. Her undergraduate and graduate degrees are both in computer science: a BS from Duke and an MS from South Carolina. After a 10-year career in industry and multiple stints a... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Kim Center 105

3:45pm

Afternoon Refreshments
Afternoon Snack Break

Friday September 29, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Kim Center at Belhaven University

4:15pm

Round Table Discussion
Round Table Session

Friday September 29, 2017 4:15pm - 5:30pm
Kim Center 202

4:15pm

SMACS Meeting
Student Meeting

Friday September 29, 2017 4:15pm - 5:30pm
Kim Center 106

5:30pm

Wizard Show
Garon the Wizard and the Mistress of Potions will entertain and educate attendees as they present the before-dinner Wizard Show.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Maguire

Cynthia Maguire

Senior Lecturer, Texas Woman’s University
Cynthia Maguire earned her bachelor of science in medical technology from Central State University in 1976. She later earned two M.S. degrees--biology teaching (2001) and chemistry teaching (2004), both from Texas Woman’s University. She remained at TWU and is now a Senior Lecturer in the Chemistry and Biochemistry... Read More →
avatar for Garon Smith

Garon Smith

Professor Emeritus, University of Montana
Garon Smith is a Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Montana. He received his B.A. degree in Environmental Biology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1973 and his Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry from the Colorado school of Mines in 1983. He has previously served on the faculties of Colorado School of Mines, Colorado College and SUNY College at Fredonia. At The University of Montana in Missoula since 1991, Dr. Smith taught the first half of the introductory chemistry sequence for applied science majors as well as upper division and graduate courses in analytical and environmental chemistry. He retired from full-time teaching in July 2015.Since 1992, Dr. Smith has been the chemist for the University of... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Kim Center 200

6:45pm

Dinner
Dinner

Friday September 29, 2017 6:45pm - 8:00pm
Kim Center 202

7:30pm

Teaching (and Learning) with Energy, Food, and Trash
Energy, food and trash! One's own campus provides an almost inexhaustible source of content. Equally importantly, topics in campus energy use, food supply chains, and waste ñdisposalî can help engage students in learning content in their introductory chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental science courses. Furthermore, these topics offer opportunities for undergraduate research and civic engagement A win-win-win scenario!

For 20 years, I served on the author team, including as editor-in-chief, of Chemistry in Context, a national project of the American Chemical Society. This textbook engages students in learning chemistry through real-world contexts such as air quality, stratospheric ozone depletion, water, and energy. Five years ago, I began using the real-world context of my own university campus, connecting campus issues to larger regional and global ones. This presentation tells the campus stories, both what worked well and what did not.

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Middlecamp

Catherine Middlecamp

Peterson Family Dean of Arts & Sciences, University of Wisconsin at Madison
Professor Cathy Middlecamp is a Fellow of the American Chemical society (2009) and the Immediate Past Chair of Division of Chemical Education.  She has received two national ACS awards: the 2015 Award for Encouraging Disadvantaged Students into Careers in the Chemical Sciences an... Read More →


Friday September 29, 2017 7:30pm - 8:20pm
Kim Center at Belhaven University

8:20pm

Closing Remarks
Closing Remarks

Friday September 29, 2017 8:20pm - 8:30pm
Kim Center at Belhaven University